The Incident Definition – Types – Scene Size up – Reporting

The Incident

Definition: An event caused by a natural phenomenon or human activity that requires the intervention of emergency service personnel to prevent or mitigate loss of life and damage to property and the environment.

The Incident of a vehicle

Call for Assistance

Information to obtain:

  • Address/location of the incident.
  • Identify the origin of the call (telephone, radio, in-person, etc.)
  • Incident type (what is happening)
  • Victims (quantity and condition).
  • Actions taken.

Response

When responding to an incident, the following factors should be considered:

  • Day of the week (traffic, etc.)
  • Time of the day (school, business hours, people at home, etc.)
  • Weather (rain, wind, storms, etc.)
  • Social disturbances
  • Topography (winding roads, etc.)
  • Hazardous materials (fuel leaks, radiation, etc.)
  • Access routes (freeways, crossings, bridges, height, width, road maintenance, etc.)
  • Power lines
  • Proper vehicle placement

Types of Incidents

  • Motor vehicle collision
  • Structural fire
  • Natural phenomena
  • Water rescue
  • Medical emergency
  • Hazardous materials
  • Structural collapse
  • Electrical
  • Aircraft accident

5. Scene Size-up

Definition: The evaluation of factors that are used in the decision-making process to establish the strategy and tactics                                                                                                   

Ongoing evaluation of the incident begins when the call is received and continues until the incident is successfully mitigated.

5.1 Scene Size-Up Criteria

Using the following criteria for scene size-up, in this order:

What is the current situation? (Determine actual state.)

Where is it going? (Determine potential situation.)

How do I control it? (Determine operations and resources needed.)

5.2 Reporting

The following Information should be included in the initial report:

  • Address/location
  • Type of incident
  • Environmental conditions
  • Current situation
  • Number of victims
  • Resources needed

Exercise 3-2: Scene Size-Up

For this exercise, the instructor will be showing you three slides, which you will analyze. You will then be instructed to fill out the forms on the following three pages with the relevant information

Exercise 3-2: Scene Size-Up 

Scene Size-up

What is the current situation? (actual state)

Where is it going? (potential situation)

How can we control it? (operations and resources needed)

Guide to Reporting Scene Information (to Dispatch Office) Address/location

Type of incident

Environmental conditions

Problems present

Number of victims Resources needed

Where is it going? (potential situation)

How can we control it? (operations and resources needed)

Guide to Reporting Scene Information (to Dispatch Office) Address/location

Type of incident

Environmental conditions

Problems present

Number of victims

Resources needed

Securing the Scene

There are three priorities when securing the scene:

1) Place your vehicle properly.

2) Isolate and mark the scene.

3) Mitigate risks.

Gaining Access

The MFR should always analyse the need for personal protection such as helmet, eye protection, mask, self-contained breathing apparatus, gloves, etc. before attempting to gain access to a patient.

In case the incident occurs in water, cliffs, etc., the MFR should request assistance from specially trained personnel.

7.1 Basic Tools

Fill in the local names used for the tools listed below:

Pry bar

Pliers

Automatic center punch.

Screwdriver

Tin snips              

Hammer             

Knife    

Rope    

Vise grips Axe

Hacksaw

Rubber mallet

Personal protective equipment.

Kelly tool.

 

7.2 Gaining Access to Buildings

Always look for alternate means of entry. Consider the easiest route for entry and exit based on the situation and the patient’s needs.

Doors.

Windows.

7.3 Gaining Access to Vehicles Using Basic Toois

Generally and if possible, medical treatment should begin before the patient is extricated. The patient should be removed in such way as to minimize further injury. Access may be simple (not requiring tools) or complex (requiring tools and special training). Take only those steps you are trained to take. Call for additional resources.

 

Doors.

Windows            


Post Test Incident

  • List the five items of Information to obtain when receiving a call for assistance.
  • List five factors to consider when responding to a call.
  • List the three steps to scene size-up, in proper order.
  • List the six items of information that should be included in the initial report to the dispatch office when arriving at the scene.
  • List the three steps to secure the scene.
  • List basic tools used to gain access to a patient trapped in a vehicle.
  • List two ways to gain access to Patient trapped in a vehicle.
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